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Discussion Starter #1
Hi people,

Anyone has any idea how many weeks Audi presently taking to deliver a 2.0 Sportback TDi Sport A3 in the UK? I booked mine on of 6th of Nov and didn’t get the touch down date yet. :wub:
How long did it take for you guys when you ordered yours?

Thanks in advance.
 

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Hi, it took 8 weeks almost to the day for mine to arrive with the dealer but I never got an exact date so good luck with that!
 

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Hi,

Mine is due on Tuesday....exactly 9 weeks for an S-Line DSG Lava Grey (not sportback) I put a few options on there too so that may have delayed it slightly. I only just got a date out of Audi....4 days before delivery!

How you getting on with yours Mandy? run in yet?

Cheers

Robbie
 

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Hi there - I got mine yesterday! Mauritius Blue, Sat Nav Plus, DSG - such fun to drive! It took 11 weeks for mine...!

Its worth the wait though..!
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Congratulations to all of you three!!!! Enjoy!!!

I’m still waiting for the mighty phone call from my dealer. :wub:
 

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Discussion Starter #6
At last.....got the date from the dealer. It's 21st of Dec 2005, 7 weeks since we placed the order.
2.0 TDi Sport Sportback, Black with light grey interior, centre armrest, non-smoking pack, electrically folded door mirrors, rear floor mats, luggage compartment Pack and parking sensor.

However, they said I can take the delivery on January, 2006 to get '2006' as the registration year. Does it really add any extra value when I’ll sell it off?? I don’t have any plan yet to change this car in next 6 yrs though.

Another thing that I’m thinking about is the engine break-in period. 95% of my driving involves motorway and in January when I’ll start going to work, perhaps it won’t be possible to maintain variable speed keeping the rpm down below 2500 all the time on the motorway. But during Christmas I can drive at lest 500/600 miles maintaining all the break-in periods rules. Anybody please suggest me what should be the best for me to do?

I really appreciate your comments and thank you in advance for that.
 

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The break in period does not really mean anything these days... the only thing is dont boot it hard for the first 1k i would say.. Motorway crusing will do it no harm - keep around 70mph for the first 100 miles or so then it drive normal and gently..

I have heard a lot of the engines are ran for about 48 hours or longer continuously before been put in the car to ensure all is ok, so its all ready been running at high revs for a while..

Also one other thing is that they "say" break the engine in slowly and drive slowly id due to the new tyres been slippy and the disc and pads need to break in together.

ENJOY!!!!
 

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Congratulations Mac!

Re. breaking in - I was just told to take it carefully for the first 100 miles and most importantly not slam the brakes on! Like Rick said, "they" say to take it easy for the first 1k miles and vary your motorway speed where possible but I wouldn't worry too much about it! Ask the dealer what they advise when you collect it.

Have fun!!!
 

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Discussion Starter #9
humm........
I didn't know that these days' car don't need to go through the break-in period; I just assumed that modern engines break in relatively very quick compare to the older models.

Form my 1st year of engineering (automobile wasn’t my stream but the 1st year is the same for all of us in my country) what I came to know is ‘breaking in a new engine’ means you are basically attempting to set the piston rings and the valves evenly and that is very very important for a mechanical engine in terms performance for long run. To do this, the most important thing is to be very careful about not to keep the engine at constant revs and preferably not exceeding 2500 to 3000 rpms during the breaking in period. I've also heard that synthetic motor oil should not be used during the break-in period because they work too well in keeping friction down.

Now the thing, which I don’t know is how many miles I/we need to run to do this. But I can guess that varies from manufacturer to manufacturer. TDi takes a bit longer to set. Most manufacturers have recommendations in their handbooks.

As Rick said, I also heard about that 48 hours or so continuous run at the manufactures but as far as I know only Lamborghini (and maybe only few other sports car like Porsche) do that. They put the engine in a special stand and run it for couple of days to make it ready-to-go for all of the brothers and sisters of Mr. Shumaker. :p
I'm not sure though about other manufactures.

Many thanks for your comments.
 

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Hi Mac,

Congrats on the new motor!

Whoever said that motorway cruising will do it no harm has no knowledge of engines! PLEASE DO NOT LISTEN TO THAT ADVICE! I'm an aerospace engineer so do consider myself fairly well versed on this one!

Motorway cruising is just about the worst possible thing you could do to a new engine! If you want a smokey diesel that is slow and not economical then drive away on cruise control all day!
If you want a clean burning, economical and powerful motor do what I advise below!

When your engine is new the cylinder walls are actually 'honed', that is to say they have a rough surface that is intentionally milled in. This is designed so that as the piston travels up and down it's stroke the rings are 'filed' to the correct fit. Now here's the controversial bit, when you get your new car don't even idle it! Get in and drive, the first 20 - 250 miles being the most important! If you leave it to idle all that will happen is the rings will not be pressed against the cylinder wall hard enough and the honing will be polished off. You need to get on with driving! Never over-rev a cold engine, it's one of the worst things you could do but over revving a new warm engine is not so dangerous. For the first 250 miles when the engine is cold (ie less than a quarter way up the temp guage) don't change up a gear until around 2500RPM, once it is warmed up change around 3000RPM or above but don't rag it! What we are trying to do is force the rings onto the cylinder walls to get them 'filed' to fit. If you think about it there is no way spring compression could stop the gases at 10's of thousands of PSI from getting past the ring, therefore it's the gas itself that creates the seal. When the pressure rises in the cylinder a small amount of gas seeps behind the ring and forces it onto the cylinder walls, the higher the pressure the better the seal! With a turbo car the rings are designed for even higher pressures and tolerances so you need to work it to get the rings working properly, this means keeping it 'on boost'. Hence not changing before the rpm values mentioned above.

The reason cruising is bad is that constant revs causes scoring of the cylinder walls and rings....not good!

Now I'm sure to get flamed for this post by the 'well that's not what it says in the manual' people but each to their own. But put it this way, my car before last did over 200,000 miles without a hitch....and it was an Alfa Romeo!!! Most top tuners follow this regime so that they get ultimate power from an engine. Blow past means loss of power! This is a bit 'conspiracy theory' but my honest thoughts are that the manufacturers only want your engine to last 150K otherwise sales would drop! Just a thought!

Once you are past this 250 mile mark keep working the engine, don't top end it but keep the revs up, listen for the turbo spinning up, this is telling you that the engine is being worked and those rings are being honed. Once you are past the 1k margin have all the fun you like! Never labour it though! Also, with variable geometry turbines keeping the revs at a constant (ie cruise) the vanes never move position but they do get clogged up! Try to vary the revs just slightly over long distances, even if this means dropping off cruise for a while.

The worst things you can do to a new engine is over rev when cold, cruise control and labour at any time!

Have fun, if you've got any questions give me a shout!

Cheers

Robbie
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Hi Robbie,

Many thanks for your comments and advice. I too, was a bit surprised when proper ‘break-in’ appeared to be lees important from other the posts. I didn’t think about any thing why “break-in” will become less (or least) important as the basic concept of the engine still remains the same since it was invented by Nikolaus Otto in 1876. As I said, I just assumed it will take less time than its ancestors.

I just didn’t quite follow on this:

Originally posted by robbie414@Dec 19 2005, 03:28 PM
For the first 250 miles when the engine is cold (ie less than a quarter way up the temp guage) don't change up a gear until around 2500RPM, once it is warmed up change around 3000RPM or above but don't rag it!
When the engine is cold, not changing gear until ~2500 is fine but the next part a bit confusing to me. So did you mean when the engine is started warming up, I have to wait even longer, until 3000-ish for changing gear? Or did you mean to say something else which I didn’t understand?

Cheers!!!
 

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Morning Mac,

Yeah you are correct, basically what I am saying is take it easy (but not too easy) when the engine is cold. Change at ~ 2500 when is is warming up and once it is warmed up rev up to at least 3000RPM, you'll hear the turbo spinning up and this means the rings are being worked. Don't rag it but don't wrap it in cotton wool either. Never leave it running on the drive to 'warm it up' as this actually does a **** of a lot more harm than good!

The advice about running in has changed somewhat from days gone by in that parts in the top half of the engine and bearing surfaces are now much better machined to much better tolerances. Material science has changed a lot too resulting in engines that pratically leave the factory 'run in' other than the rings themselves. As you correctly mentioned in one of your earlier posts the running in of the rings is the most important part.

Taking my advice is totally up to you, it's not what the manufacturer recommends but speak to a race team mechanic (ie not a 'technician' or sales guy from the dealership) and they will give you the same advice.

Whilst I'm on 'technicians' a friend of mine went into his local audi garage last week with a vibration coming from the rear end of his a4. I suggested that from experience it may be a bearing problem. He took it into the garage and the 'master technician' got it up on the ramps, looked at the tyres and told him it was simply uneven tyre wear. He could see the patchyness on the tyres and settled for the answer and a new set of rears! He came round to mine and looked all smug when he said it was simply extremely uneven tyre wear........my answer was "well what the heck do you think caused this??" The penny dropped, took it to another dealership and the root cause was found to be ........bearings....!
It just scares me that we put our lives in the hands of these guys when most of them are nothing more than people who keep on replacing each part in the vicinity of the problem until it stops. They usually don't have a clue what is causing it!

Rant over lol

Cheers

Robbie
 

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good points "robbie414" ... however - from a technical infrastructure of an engine this may/is correct however im not in a position with my knowledge to agree or disagree, but from past experience i have never had an issue, (last car i had i put 195k Miles on it (NOT KM) and have never had a problem... i personally think the key to a long lasting engine is to just take it easy and look after it...

Also personally.... i think that theres no way these days you cant go anywhere without using the motorways -

my advice is just take it easy...

"robbie414" if you dont mind im going to forward this link to a mate of mine whos a Technical Tutor for mechanics for Mercedes, just for an other point of view..

Cheers to all!
 

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Hi Rick and Mac

No not at all please forward it on. Hopefully he will agree, if not then i'll love to point him to some contacts at Bristol University faculty of Engineering (where I got my degree) they'll love to argue the point i'm sure! :)

Incidentally I live in derbyshire and travel 30 miles to work in the peak district every day, I use the motorway very rarely!
You can travel the length and width of the entire country without using motorways!

I'm sure you haven't had an "issue" Rick, but have you ever dyno'd an engine that has been run in one way and the same model run in another? Have you ever closely inspected pistons from those engines and seen scorching caused by blow past, and then looked at the pistons run in the 'unconventional' way and seen shiny clean surfaces clearly indicating well seated rings? There's a growing number of people waking up to this method, it's totally up to you as to whether or not you listen to it.
It's kinda like taking paracetamol, if the headache does not go away is the drug working or would it have been even worse if you didn't take it?? Would you car have been quicker more responsive and more economical if you had run it in this way, even though you had no "issues"?? :57:

Check out this chaps website, he deals mainly with motorcycle engines but you can see the results for yourself!

http://www.mototuneusa.com/break_in_secrets.htm


Mac....have you got it yet???? You must be very excited!! I'm sure it "goes" very quickly!!! :)

Cheers

Robbie
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Yeah, got it now :460: :460:
.....and really very excited now. Picked up the car at about 4 O' clock; the transaction took a bit longer than expected, started getting dark so didn’t get much time to explore. I just drove only ~25 miles so far; ‘shifting gear’ is very smooth and I liked the sound system – it’s not Bose but still that quite impressive and the neat interior. Unfortunately it turned up that the sales people don’t actually have that much of technical knowledge. They left me with a few unanswered queries but overall they were good and really helpful within their limit.

Funny thing happened with the reverse gear – went to the Tesco, stopped in front of the parking bay, engaged the reverse gear to put me in proper position and found the car is rolling forward…ended up with “switching on the hazard light” and a long queue of cars behind me. Called them (the dealer) up and, ohh dear, they said just push the lever down (I was trying lifting it up in stead) and then engage the reverse gear – they forgot to tell me and I forgot to ask as well. :bwekk:

I may have few questions for you guys, later, as I’ll start exploring the car. At the moment I wanna ask you one thing – do you know what diagnostic/communication protocol Audi use? Is it equipped with CAN Bus? And where I can find the diagnostic port situated? I really appreciated if any one can reply to this.

Now going to read the manual from the top to bottom – hope it will be finished by the dawn :grin:
Cheers!!!
 

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LOL!! i bet you looked a fool in your brand new car and could park!! :bwekk:

The A3 is CAN - Ross-Tech have not got there site updated as yet... but i guess if you do some digging you will find it out easy enough!!

Have a read of the below when you get a min to find out everything you need to know!!

http://www.ross-tech.com/vag-com/canbus.html


ENJOY!!
 

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Hi Mac,

Excellent news! peeing myself laughing at your tesco story!

Have fun in your new motor!

Nice link Rick, thanks for the info!

Cheers

Robbie
 
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